LANGUAGE IN INDIA

Strength for Today and Bright Hope for Tomorrow

Volume 13:9 September 2013
ISSN 1930-2940

Managing Editor: M. S. Thirumalai, Ph.D.
Editors: B. Mallikarjun, Ph.D.
         Sam Mohanlal, Ph.D.
         B. A. Sharada, Ph.D.
         A. R. Fatihi, Ph.D.
         Lakhan Gusain, Ph.D.
         Jennifer Marie Bayer, Ph.D.
         S. M. Ravichandran, Ph.D.
         G. Baskaran, Ph.D.
         L. Ramamoorthy, Ph.D.
         C. Subburaman, Ph.D. (Economics)
Assistant Managing Editor: Swarna Thirumalai, M.A.

HOME PAGE

Click Here for Back Issues of Language in India - From 2001




BOOKS FOR YOU TO READ AND DOWNLOAD FREE!


REFERENCE MATERIAL

BACK ISSUES


  • E-mail your articles and book-length reports in Microsoft Word to languageinindiaUSA@gmail.com.
  • PLEASE READ THE GUIDELINES GIVEN IN HOME PAGE IMMEDIATELY AFTER THE LIST OF CONTENTS.
  • Your articles and book-length reports should be written following the APA, MLA, LSA, or IJDL Stylesheet.
  • The Editorial Board has the right to accept, reject, or suggest modifications to the articles submitted for publication, and to make suitable stylistic adjustments. High quality, academic integrity, ethics and morals are expected from the authors and discussants.

Copyright © 2012
M. S. Thirumalai


Custom Search

Fabulating through the Spiritual:
Gibranís The Prophet and Anandís Bliss

Roghayeh Farsi, Ph.D.
Neyshabur University, Iran


Abstract

This paper is a comparative study of Gibran Khalil Gibranís The Prophet (1923) and J. S. Anandís Bliss: The Ultimate Magic (2007). This cross-cultural comparison traces a line of development from early up to late twentieth century. While Gibranís text embodies his anxiety about modernity and its aftermaths, Bliss addresses the already lost generation of the postmodern era. Thematically, both works are texts of spirituality. The Prophet is a fictional narrative in prose-poetry, while Anandís text is a philosophical treatise hybridized with poetry and narrative. Despite this structural discrepancy, both texts emerge out of a dialogical texture. The Prophet develops out of the dialogue between Al-Mustafa and people of the fictional city, Orphalese. Bliss, in contrast, dialogizes directly with the reader. This paper takes the dialogical base as an important shared feature which interlinks the spiritual crisis of the modern age with the urgent hail to the soul in the postmodern era. This comparative study adopts a Deleuzian lens and takes both texts as their writersí attempts to fabulate through sloganizing spirituality against a backdrop of scientific and materialistic logic. It is argued that both texts legend a better people by training them into world citizens.

Key words: Gibran, Anand, fabulation, slogan, dialogism

Introduction

Modernity and industrialization have brought about a gap between body and soul. Science with its experimental outlook has marked manís vision with a materialistic and calculative perspective. Modernism, as the cultural movement against this materialism, manifests manís mental disintegration. Yet this does not imply manís return to the spiritual. As the nausea of all traditional beliefs, modernism has ignored the spiritual dimension of manís life. As spirituality is closely linked with religion, lack of the spiritual is related to the modernist suspicion towards religious belief. This spiritual ignorance is reinforced through Freudís psychological scrutiny and is taken to its heights in the hands of Lacan and Derrida. Therefore, from the late nineteenth century onwards, the world has been witnessing reduction of the soul to the rationalizing faculty of mind especially through its experimental analysis of manís psyche. Even when Symbolism sprang up as a revolutionary movement, ďtending toward the spirituality . . . in response to the dislocations brought upon the modern individual by the industrial revolution,Ē it did not reject outright rationalism (Sheehi 81).


This is only the beginning part of the article. PLEASE CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE IN PRINTER-FRIENDLY VERSION.


Roghayeh Farsi, Ph.D.
Neyshabur University
Neyshabur, Khorasan Razavi
Iran
rofarsi@yahoo.com
Farsiroghayeh1956@gmail.com

Custom Search


  • Click Here to Go to Creative Writing Section

  • Send your articles
    as an attachment
    to your e-mail to
    languageinindiaUSA@gmail.com.
  • Please ensure that your name, academic degrees, institutional affiliation and institutional address, and your e-mail address are all given in the first page of your article. Also include a declaration that your article or work submitted for publication in LANGUAGE IN INDIA is an original work by you and that you have duly acknowledged the work or works of others you used in writing your articles, etc. Remember that by maintaining academic integrity we not only do the right thing but also help the growth, development and recognition of Indian/South Asian scholarship.